9. Recognise sexism and gender stereotypes in the media, and tell others about it

In this challenge, we encourage you to learn more about the impact of sexism and gender stereotypes in the media.

Watch the trailer for Miss Representation. It explores the effects of gender stereotyping in the media. Send it to a colleague, friend or family member. Share the main message you took from it about violence against women.

You might have heard of the term ‘sexual objectification’. This guide includes five easy questions that can help you recognise it. Caroline Heldman created these questions. She discusses the topic in more detail in this TedX talk.

How does it help?

Research shows that being regularly exposed to media that sexually objectifies women contributes to sexist attitudes and gender stereotypes. In turn, this increases the likelihood of men’s violence against women.

Media, marketing and advertising can strengthen or challenge the attitudes that create gender inequality and enable violence against women (Fergus, 2012).

Evidence shows that changing and challenging harmful and sexist media messages can help to prevent violence against women. This is because it promotes gender equality and diversity, and challenges gender stereotypes.

Keep going!

Keep taking action to recognise and challenge gender stereotypes in the media:

  • Boycott films and TV shows that show gender bias and stereotypes.
  • Make sure that the images and posters at your workplace/sports club/community group do not encourage gender stereotypes. If they do, say something about it!
  • Challenge sexism in advertising.
  • Check out Collective Shout. This grassroots Australian organisation challenges how women and girls are objectified and sexualised in media and advertising.

Please note that these clips/articles contain information regarding the topics of sexism, gender inequality and violence against women. If you find the information distressing, please click through for information and support on self care. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, please visit the our help section for further information and support.

10. Recognise how violence against women is also a men’s issue, and share this with others

In Australia, 39 per cent of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from a male. Thirty-four per cent have experienced this violence from someone they know (Cox 2016). Clearly, violence against women is a men’s issue too.

Watch this video by Jackson Katz, an expert in preventing men’s violence against women. Then share it with a male friend or colleague.

How does it help?

International research recognises that working with men and boys is essential for ending men’s violence against women. This requires men to:

  • recognise that violence against women affects us all
  • recognise that gender inequality drives violence against women
  • commit to ending it.

Keep going!

You can continue to support men’s role as allies in ending violence against women:

  • Read more about what men can do to prevent violence against women.
  • Commit to some of the actions on this list of things men can do to end men’s violence against women.
  • Attend events about ending men’s violence against women and supporting gender equality.

Please note that these clips/articles contain information regarding the topics of sexism, gender inequality and violence against women. If you find the information distressing, please click through for information and support on self care. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, please visit the our help section for further information and support.

11. Find out why we have a gender pay gap in Australia and tell others about it

Many of us know that there is a gender pay gap in Australia, but don’t understand why. The Australian Government has identified five key factors that contribute to it.

  • Visit this web page to find out more about these factors and other aspects of the gender pay gap. Then talk to a friend, colleague or family member about it.
  • Check out Australia’s Gender Equality Scorecard. See how we are tracking in closing the gender pay gap and creating equality at work.

How does it help?

International research shows that the unequal distribution of power and resources between women and men is one of the main drivers of violence against women. The gender pay gap contributes to unequal power between women and men. This includes economic resources, social status and participation in decision-making. It also makes it more difficult for women to leave a violent partner.

Keep going!

You can continue to take action about the gender pay gap:

  • Break down some of the misconceptions around the gender pay gap with this video. Be prepared when people say the pay gap isn’t real!
  • Learn about the ways gender pay equality also benefits men in this article.
  • Suggest a gender pay audit at your workplace to ensure pay equity.
  • Read this checklist that describes pay equity practice.

Please note that these clips/articles contain information regarding the topics of sexism, gender inequality and violence against women. If you find the information distressing, please click through for information and support on self care. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, please visit the our help section for further information and support.

12. Recognise myths about violence against women and educate others about them

There are many myths that exist about men’s violence against women in Australia. Read this list by The Line to get the facts. Find the myth that speaks to you the most. Share it with friends, colleagues or family on Facebook, Twitter or by email.

How does it help?

Many myths exist about violence against women. These include what causes it, who is affected by it, and who is responsible. Busting these myths helps end men’s violence against women and promote gender equality. You can take action by raising awareness and increasing understanding in your networks.

Keep going!

You can keep recognising and challenging myths about violence against women:

Challenge myths about violence against women when you hear them.


Please note that these clips/articles contain information regarding the topics of sexism, gender inequality and violence against women. If you find the information distressing, please click through for information and support on self care. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, please visit the our help section for further information and support.